Tim Rudell

Senior Reporter

Tim Rudell has worked in broadcasting and news since his student days at Kent State in the late 1960s and early 1970s (when he earned extra money as a stringer for UPI). He began full time in radio news in 1972 in his home town of Canton, OH.  

In 1976 he moved to television and for the next dozen years did double duty as an anchorman and the news director for TV stations including the NBC affiliates in Youngstown, OH, Grand Rapids, MI, and Buffalo, NY. He then became Vice President of Consulting, and later Executive Vice President for one of the TV industry's leading research and consulting firms, Reymer & Gersin, Associates, with direct consulting assignments including newsrooms  in New York, Los Angles, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and Kansas City,.

In the 1990s, he was Vice President and Washington Bureau Chief for TVDirect, a joint venture of The Associated Press and Conus Communications that provided live and custom reporting from the nation's capital. Later he was promoted to Senior Vice President and division General Manager of Conus Washington, and eventually to Executive Vice President of Conus.  He then move over to the AP to become a member of the senior management of Associated Press Television News, responsible for advancing APTN's downstream businesses in North America. 

From 2004 through the end of 2008 he was Managing General Partner and CEO of a Washington area consulting group including Media Services Co. of America, and Independent Business Advisors of Virginia.  

In 2009 Tim and wife Fran decided  to return to their roots in northeast Ohio: "to go home, and do some things we wanted to do." He joined WKSU and became a reporter again, resuming the role that originally drew him to news.  

Ways to Connect

Amer Othman Adi in his downtown Youngstown business
Congressman Tim Ryan's office

Youngstown entrepreneur and downtown business owner Amer Othman Adi is not leaving the country this weekend. Immigration authorities had ordered him deported because of questions about the legality of his entry into the U.S. 39 years ago.  But, a groundswell of local support for Adi backed them off, for now.

The government says Adi married a U.S. citizen when he came to America, got a green card, then the couple divorced; it maintains the marriage was a sham. Although he offered evidence for years that the nearly three year marriage was real, he was finally ordered to leave. 

METRO RTA HQ, board meeting room
Tim Rudell / WKSU

The fate of METRO RTA Executive Director Richard Enty remains unknown.

Enty has been on paid administrative leave -- his third suspension in his five years heading the public transit agency -- since November.

The agency’s board held a special meeting today to discuss “a personnel matter.” Immediately after assembling, the Board went into executive session. It adjourned without comment about an hour later.  Legal counsel Karen Adinolfi would only say that no decisions were made. 

Minenges
NIH / Wikipedia

There has been another death from bacterial meningitis is Tuscarawas County, the second in two weeks.  But, the cases do not appear to be related.

Tuscarawas County Health Commissioner Katie Seward says there is no known connection between the latest victim--whose identity is not yet being released—and 14-year-old Ryan Freedland of Port Washington, who died Dec. 15th. 

Ohio is expanding Medicaid coverage for acupuncture. Last fall it began approving payment for the non-drug pain treatment if it was provided by medical doctors.  

But thousands more practitioners will be included in the New Year.

Under the new rules, up to 30 acupuncture treatments a year by chiropractors can be covered.

transporting pipes for pipeline construction
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

With the passage of the new federal tax law questions about how it will affect different parts of the economy are emerging.  In Ohio that is especially true for what the tax changes may mean to the energy industry. 

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