Morning Headlines: Families Mourn Fertility Clinic Disaster; Cuyahoga Cleanup Draws Hundreds

May 14, 2018

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, May 14:

  • Families who lost eggs and embryos  in fertility center disaster hold memorial service;
  • Summit health officials report opioid overdoses are down as dealers dilute drugs;
  • Hundreds of volunteers turn out for 28th annual Canalway Partners RiverSweep;
  • Cleveland Clinic and parents of teen with brain tumor take dispute over treatment to court;
  • Kenmore drive-by shooting leaves three wounded;
  • Columbus police create cell phone forensics unit;
  • Memphis Belle, now restored, to be unveiled in Dayton;

Families who lost eggs and embryos  in fertility center disaster hold memorial service
Families affected by a fertility clinic disaster gathered over the weekend to mourn their loss. About 950 families lost 4,000 eggs and embryos at a University Hospitals fertility clinic in March when a freezer storage tank rose in temperature. Cleveland.com reports about three dozen people held a memorial service at Woodvale Cemetery in Middleburgh Heights on Saturday. A memorial bench was unveiled in memory of the lost eggs and embryos.

Summit health officials report opioid overdoses are down as dealers dilute drugs
More than half of Summit County drug overdoses from January through March were from Akron. That’s according to a report released Friday by county health officials. About 400 Summit County residents sought emergency care after overdosing in the first three months of the year. The report also shows synthetic opiates have almost entirely replaced heroin in Summit, Portage, Stark, Tuscarawas and Carroll counties. The Beacon Journal reports dealers are also diluting drugs to avoid overdoses and prison time.

Hundreds of volunteers turn out for 28th annual Canalway Partners RiverSweep
More than 700 volunteers took part in the annual cleanup of the Cuyahoga River Valley this weekend. In 28 years, the Canalway Partners RiverSweep has collected more than 600 tons of trash. The annual event aims to clear the way for a park and trail system along the Ohio Canal, running from Cleveland to New Philadelphia.

Cleveland Clinic and parents of teen with brain tumor take dispute over treatment to court
The Cleveland Clinic and the family of a teen with a brain tumor are facing off in court to decide the best course of treatment. The Plain Dealer reports the Clinic is recommending chemotherapy for 14-year-old Zara Ali, but her parents are pushing for natural and holistic medicine. Both sides agree the tumor cannot be removed by surgery. A judge has set a hearing for Friday.

Kenmore drive-by shooting leaves three wounded
A drive-by shooting in Akron’s Kenmore neighborhood has left three people wounded. Police say the victims were talking outside a home in the city Saturday evening when they were shot. Responding officers found a 29-year-old man with a gunshot wound. He was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Police say they later learned a 22-year-old man and a 21-year-old woman had arrived at a hospital with gunshot wounds. Their injuries do not appear to be life-threatening. No arrests have been made.

Columbus police create cell phone forensics unit
Police in Columbus are creating a new digital forensics unit for officers to analyze and download information from cellphones taken during investigations. The Dispatch reports the new unit is expected to be fully staffed by year's end. Police Chief Kim Jacobs says there's a big need for the digital unit, pointing out that 20 cellphones were taken from a house in one homicide case, leaving the analysis to one detective who covers all three homicide shifts. Detective James Howe says location information extracted from phones can sometimes put killers near crime scenes. He says it typically takes him three to four hours to search a phone. Jacobs says the unit will be funded with money exchanged for the department's help with federal task force cases.

Memphis Belle, now restored, to be unveiled in Dayton
One of the most celebrated aircraft of World War II will be unveiled after 13 years of restoration. The B-17F Memphis Belle  goes on display at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton beginning Thursday. The Memphis Belle was celebrated as the first  U.S. Army Air Forces heavy bomber to return to the United States after completing the required 25 missions in Europe. The public opening of the exhibit in the World War II Gallery represents more than a dozen years and 55,000 hours of restoration work.