Catherine Turcer

Jack Cera
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Ohio voters may see not one, but two, issues next year overhauling the way congressional districts are drawn. In the words of one advocate: “I care about slaying the gerrymander because I’m an American.”

Here is the fourth installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines."

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

Picture of Catherine Turcer
Karen Kasler

State legislative leaders have formed a four-member bipartisan group to work on creating a new way to redraw Ohio’s Congressional district map, which will be redone after the 2020 census. But supporters of an effort already underway to change the map drawing process aren’t backing down.

photo of Catherine Turcer
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The groups working on a constitutional amendment to change the way Congressional districts are created in Ohio spent this weekend managing a setback for their effort to get the issue on the ballot.

photo of Kasich graphic
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich wants lawmakers to tackle the way Congressional districts are created, saying they need to be more competitive and fair. 

Kasich says it’s time to stop gerrymandering.

“Well, we are going to put it in the budget where we are going to try to do with congressional redistricting the same thing they’ve done with legislative redistricting,” he said.

photo of Mike Gonidakis
STATE OF OHIO/OHIO PUBLIC TELEVISION

There are calls for the president of the Ohio State Medical Board to step down over comments he’s made about a pending case. 

Earlier this month, Ohio Right to Life filed a complaint with the state’s medical board, accusing three Dayton physicians of performing an abortion on a woman who was could not give consent because she had been drugged or impaired.

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