Cavs

Photo of LeBron James
Brian Babineau / NBAE via Getty Images

The Cavs dominated the Boston Celtics last night, beating them 117-104 in the first game of the Eastern Conference Finals.

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says Cleveland did exactly what it needed to do in Boston. 

"The Cavs completely dominated early and totally took out Isaiah Thomas, who is Boston’s 5’9 guard, took him right out of the game. I think he was like 3-of-11 shooting in the first half, and he just looked worn down and confused. It was just a force.  A completely dominating performance by the Cavs."

photo of Kyrie Irving in wingfoot Cavs jersey
GOODYEAR

While the Cavs work to defend their NBA title, the team has been making big money moves off the court.

The Cavs recently got a commitment for $140 million in public funding for renovations to Quicken Loans Arena. This week, the team announced a partnership with Akron-based Goodyear Tire and Rubber for its signature wingfoot logo to appear on jerseys next season.

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto explains why both of these moves have been controversial but necessary:

The Cavs’ first two playoff games have shown just how difficult defending their NBA title is going to be. Cleveland is up 2-0 over the Indiana Pacers, but both games have come down to the final minutes. 

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says the Cavs’ regular season struggles are evident early in these playoffs, but  the Cavs have some time to settle in: 

The slogan for the Cavs’ postseason is “Defend the Land.” And Pluto says players need to start taking that literally. “They better start defending somebody.”

photo of Cavs home court
ERIK DROST / FLICKR

A coalition of Cleveland faith groups is requesting a meeting with the owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers about the proposed $140 million renovation of Quicken Loans Arena.

The Cavaliers are putting up half the money for renovations at The Q. Greater Cleveland Congregations has been vocal in its opposition to the plan to use public money for the other half. Now, they're requesting a meeting with Dan Gilbert to see if some funds can be sent back into Cleveland's neighborhoods.

The NBA is tapping into fans’ nostalgia by encouraging teams to wear retro uniforms for a handful of games this season. It’s a promotion intended to sell more jerseys. But for the Cavs, bringing back the bright orange of the mid 1980’s carries a deeper meaning.

WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says it all started in 1980 when Ted Stepien bought the team. "Arguably, the worst owner in the history of pro sports,” Pluto says. 

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