charter schools

Photo of Ohio Auditor Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An audit regarding alleged attendance inflation by the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is now in the hands of several investigative agencies. The review claims that ECOT padded their student data on purpose to get more money from the state. Critics say this information comes after years of ECOT operating unchecked.

photo of empty desks
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of the state’s largest public school districts will no longer be allowed to sponsor charter schools. 

The Ohio Board of Education voted 15-0 to revoke the Cincinnati Public School District’s status as a charter school sponsor. Board member Pat Bruns from Cincinnati abstained from the vote.

The revocation came after the district received a “poor” rating for the 2015-2016 school year from the state Department of Education. Cincinnati’s charter ratings did improve in the 2016-2017 academic year, but it takes only one poor rating to end a sponsorship under Ohio law.

A photo of the meeting.
Ashton Marra / ideastream

The board that oversees Cleveland’s school district is postponing a vote on new charter school partners after receiving its largest ever number of applicants. The district’s charter schools director says the delay is a good thing.

Ten already operating charter schools applied to partner with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The district's Board of Education was scheduled to vote on those partnerships at a Tuesday meeting, but pushed the vote to February because of the number of applications.

A photo of the ECOT sign.
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This week marked the end of the semester at Ohio’s largest online charter school. But the future of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow remains unclear. The school is offering a plan to the Ohio Department of Education to stay open through the end of the year. 

School desks
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A new study shows the graduation rates of Ohio’s traditional public schools are much better than those of charter schools.

The study shows even when excluding dropout-recovery schools, the four-year graduation rate of charter schools in Ohio is just under 45 percent, faring worse than public schools in Ohio’s six largest cities. Schools in Columbus, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Dayton, Akron and Toledo graduated 73 percent of their students.

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