clean energy

Photo of solar panels
SERGEY EDENTOD / SHUTTERSTOCK

Clean-energy issues have prompted a lot of debate at the Ohio Statehouse for years. Opposition has mostly come from Republicans, while Democrats have supported incentives for the industry. Now, a clean-energy group has new data that they say will change the discussion.      

The Ohio Conservative Energy Forum is pointing to a poll that shows conservative voters are 36 percent more likely to vote for someone who supports energy efficiency and increases the use of renewables.

photo of Keith Faber and John Kasich
Karen Kasler / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of the biggest fights waiting for lawmakers when they return to work after the Nov. 8 election will have to do with renewable energy in Ohio. The debate could come down to differing views between Gov. John Kasich and a leader in his own party.

Time is running out on a two-year freeze on the green energy standards that required utility companies in Ohio to use renewable energy and include energy efficiency.

photo of Blue Creek Wind Farm turbine
IBERDOLA RENWABLES

Clean energy is thriving in Ohio, according to a new jobs report. But advocates say the green energy industry can do more, with help from lawmakers. 

The report says more than 100,000 people work in the clean energy industry in Ohio.

Ian Adams with Clean Energy Trust, one of the groups that put out the report, says many are manufacturing jobs supporting the use of renewable energy in other states. And Adams adds that there would be even more jobs if Ohio brought back the green-energy standards it froze last year.

Timmons
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Advocates for clean energy usually lean on the environmental benefits of the technology, but one group says their effort is more personal.

 

For Michele Timmons, her fight for cleaner air and cleaner water is a family matter.