Cleveland Metropolitan School District

photo of lead testing
CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

A Cleveland partnership is wrapping up its lead testing of students in the city’s schools for this year. 

Mound Elementary School Nurse Angelique King reassures kindergartener Darrel as she pricks his finger and begins to collect in a small vile the drops of blood that gather on his skin.

Photo of USCG Cutter Neah Bay
U.S. COAST GUARD DISTRICT 9

Editor's note: This story has been updated to reflect that J.M. Smucker and ConAgra have called off Smucker's acquisition of Wesson oil.

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, March 7:

photo of Lyn Lotas
ASHTON MARRA / IDEASTREAM

Cleveland has a lead problem. That’s according to a school official who is now working to make sure children in the district get tested for lead exposure.

Debbie Aloshen is the director of health and nursing services for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District.  She says "lead is one of the most underreported diseases there is.” 

Aloshen says she’s seen lead exposure manifest itself in children in a variety of ways—creating mental, behavioral, and even severe physical problems.

photo of children eating lunch at school
USDA

Monday is the final day to comment on proposed changes to federal nutrition standards for school meals. The Trump administration says it wants to give schools increased flexibility after it said school officials and food providers struggled to meet the standards under the Obama administration.

‘We want healthier options’
Talisa Dixon has been the superintendent of Cleveland Heights-University Heights schools for four years.

A photo of the meeting.
Ashton Marra / ideastream

The board that oversees Cleveland’s school district is postponing a vote on new charter school partners after receiving its largest ever number of applicants. The district’s charter schools director says the delay is a good thing.

Ten already operating charter schools applied to partner with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. The district's Board of Education was scheduled to vote on those partnerships at a Tuesday meeting, but pushed the vote to February because of the number of applications.

Pages