cleveland museum of natural history

LAURA DEMPSEY / CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

For more than five decades, visitors to the Cleveland Zoo’s elephant enclosure were greeted by massive sculptures of extinct pachyderms.

Those once familiar sculptures are seeing new life at an institution across town.

Created by Cleveland artist Viktor Schreckengost in 1955, the panels featuring a mammoth, mastodon and their calves, were removed during the zoo’s 2008 remake of the elephant pens and put into storage.

Perseid meteor shower
WIKIMEDIA

  Astronomers are predicting the peak of this year’s Perseid meteor shower will take place the night of August 11th.

The annual shower will be easiest to see after moonset that night.

Jason Davis, planetarium director at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, says this yearw will be an eventful one.

POISON DART FROG
T. GRANT / American Museum of Natural History

  What we eat keeps us alive, but an exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History shows that even ordinary foods can be killers.

In today’s Quick Bite, WKSU’s Vivian Goodman explores “The Power of Poison.”

The American Museum of Natural History in New York designed “The Power of Poison” exhibition to share with museums across the country. The exhibition looks at poison as a force of nature as well as at its role in human history. And a lot of it concerns food.

WILLIAM SCHEELE / CMNH

Cleveland is known for many things: the Rock Hall, LeBron James, Playhouse Square. But it’s also known worldwide for its fish, and we’re not talking walleye and perch. 

The shale layers below Cleveland contain the world’s best preserved fossils of a monster fish that once terrorized the shallow sea covering ancient Ohio.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair marks the 50th anniversary of the effort to save these fossils from being buried under acres of concrete.

It was a race against time 50 years ago.

MET MUSEUM / MET MUSEUM

Around the time Stonehenge was being built in England, native peoples here in Ohio were building more humble structures. But an excavation this summer of an ancient settlement in Sheffield Village shows that early Ohioans lived pretty comfortably here 4,000 years ago.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how a first-of-its-kind discovery is shedding new light on archaic Ohio.

 

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