Cliff Rosenberger

photo of Gov. John Kasich
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich’s campaign website used to say he has signed every piece of pro-Second Amendment legislation he’s seen as governor and that he was endorsed by the NRA. But not anymore.

That major change came not long after he blasted Congress in his first public comments about the deadly Florida school shooting.  

photo of Daisy Tolliver with Dennis Crabrtree, Cliff Rosenberger and Scott Ryan
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican state lawmakers are hoping to help send a particular group of at-risk kids to college – those whose parents are addicted to opioids and other drugs. Republican House leaders hope to create the program with legislation being introduced soon.

photo of Kathleen Clyde, Michelle Lapor-Hagan, Teresa Fedor and Nickie Antonio
SHANE WALKER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Four Democratic women in the Ohio Legislature are calling on the head of the Ohio House to take action against a key Republican lawmaker for derogatory comments he recently made at a going away party for a former staffer.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says Rep. Bill Seitz has admitted he shouldn’t have mocked some women lawmakers.

“He’s apologized for it.”

Rosenberger wants a bipartisan focus group to take on the broader subject of sexual harassment “to make sure we are listening and hearing it out.”

A longtime state representative is formally apologizing for comments he made at a going away party earlier this week – comments that had other lawmakers fuming and calling for an investigation. 

Republican Rep. Bill Seitz of Cincinnati says in a letter to House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and members of the Ohio House that he has “deep regret and remorse” for comments made at the going-away party and roast for the Republican caucus’ chief of staff.

photo of Nickie Antonio
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The bill to protect LGBTQ people from housing and employment discrimination is expected to take a big step as a committee prepares to hear from a major supporter, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce. The bill also seems to be getting support from the top House leader.

For the first time in nearly 10 years, the bill to protect people from discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity will get a second hearing.

Pages