coal

First Energy Bulding
Tim Rudell / WKSU

FirstEnergy just got a $2.5 billion financial boost in its struggle to transition back to a fully regulated utility. Three large investment firms are buying about a 16 percent equity stake in the Akron-based energy company. 

FirstEnergy was successful as both a regulated utility and, initially, in unregulated power generation markets.  Then came new natural gas-fired power plants using cheap and abundant fuel.

Photo of solar panels
SERGEY EDENTOD / SHUTTERSTOCK

Clean-energy issues have prompted a lot of debate at the Ohio Statehouse for years. Opposition has mostly come from Republicans, while Democrats have supported incentives for the industry. Now, a clean-energy group has new data that they say will change the discussion.      

The Ohio Conservative Energy Forum is pointing to a poll that shows conservative voters are 36 percent more likely to vote for someone who supports energy efficiency and increases the use of renewables.

form U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich stands at a podium
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, Jan. 9:

photo of smoke stacks
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

The U.S. EPA is trying to roll back one of the most sweeping regulations of carbon emissions. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, opponents and supporters say this will have a big impact on Ohio.

 

  

It was one of Donald Trump’s biggest campaign rally cries when he was running for president -- ending what he called the “war on coal.” Now, his EPA director Scott Pruitt says that’s exactly what the administration is doing by rolling back the Clean Power Plan. 

Coal-fired, Sammis Power Plant
NYttend / Wikipedia

The Ohio EPA is welcoming word that U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt wants to repeal the national power plant emissions regulations written during the Obama Administration.

 

The Clean Power Plan never actually took effect because 28 states went to court to block it, arguing that it unfairly and illegally targeted coal-fired energy production. Ohio was among them as state EPA spokeswoman Heidi Griesmer explains.

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