coal

photo of smoke stacks
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

The U.S. EPA is trying to roll back one of the most sweeping regulations of carbon emissions. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, opponents and supporters say this will have a big impact on Ohio.

 

  

It was one of Donald Trump’s biggest campaign rally cries when he was running for president -- ending what he called the “war on coal.” Now, his EPA director Scott Pruitt says that’s exactly what the administration is doing by rolling back the Clean Power Plan. 

Coal-fired, Sammis Power Plant
NYttend / Wikipedia

The Ohio EPA is welcoming word that U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt wants to repeal the national power plant emissions regulations written during the Obama Administration.

 

The Clean Power Plan never actually took effect because 28 states went to court to block it, arguing that it unfairly and illegally targeted coal-fired energy production. Ohio was among them as state EPA spokeswoman Heidi Griesmer explains.

photo of smoke stacks
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years.

Customers could see additional fees on their electric bills to help prop up the struggling Ohio Valley Electric Corporation, a coal plant commonly known as OVEC.

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

One of Ohio’s largest energy companies could be closing or selling all of its power plants within the next two years.

FirstEnergy, given the current economic and regulatory climate, is reviewing what to do with its coal and nuclear plants. It says it has three options: sell the plants, close them or keep them under the condition that the state changes its regulatory framework.

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

NOTE: This is the third of three stories examining Ohio's environmental and energy future.  

Ohio’s largest energy companies are trying to figure out what they’re going to do with their coal power plants as they navigate through a vital time in the utilities industry. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow explores the different paths those utilities can take and what that means for Ohio residents.

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