coal

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

NOTE: This is the third of three stories examining Ohio's environmental and energy future.  

Ohio’s largest energy companies are trying to figure out what they’re going to do with their coal power plants as they navigate through a vital time in the utilities industry. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow explores the different paths those utilities can take and what that means for Ohio residents.

photo of Sammis plant
FIRSTENERGY

Ohioans could see a new charge on their electric bills as early as June, now that state regulators have approved plans by FirstEnergy and AEP to guarantee income for struggling coal plants. But opponents of the costs say the fight isn’t over. 

Photo of a FirstEnergy coal power plant
FIRST ENERGY / WIKIPEDIA

A vote is set for tomorrow on plans from FirstEnergy and AEP that is estimated to hike customers’ electricity bills by nearly $6 billion over eight years and to generate guaranteed income for struggling coal plants.  

Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis logo
Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis

 A new study is providing more ammunition for opponents against the so-called coal plant bailout proposed by two electric utilities. 

The report from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis , or IEEFA, says FirstEnergy’s plan to guarantee a profit for their struggling coal plants would cost consumers $4 billion.

Timmons
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Advocates for clean energy usually lean on the environmental benefits of the technology, but one group says their effort is more personal.

 

For Michele Timmons, her fight for cleaner air and cleaner water is a family matter.

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