congressional redistricting

8th St. entrance, Affinity Medical Center
Affinity Medical Center website

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, Jan. 17:

photo of Pot and Puppies
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

For the next seven months, a few groups will be circulating petitions, trying to get enough valid signatures to put issues on the 2018 general ballot.

Advocates of Congressional redistricting reform are hoping to get a plan before voters next fall. But Ohio lawmakers are trying to get their own plan through the Legislature by Feb. 7 to put it on the ballot in May.

early voting 2012
ROMULUS MILHALTEANU / WKSU

In Ohio, state lawmakers and voting advocates are working on perhaps-competing plans to revamp Congressional redistricting. But ours is not the only state struggling with how political maps are drawn. A Wisconsin case is before the U.S. Supreme Court. A voter initiative is underway in Michigan. Lawmakers are debating change in Pennsylvania. And California has replaced politicians with a citizen commission. In the final installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s M.L. Schultze looks at the efforts here and elsewhere.

collecting signatures
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Over the past five decades, Ohio’s Congressional districts have become increasingly “safe” for incumbents. And a big reason for that is the way the districts are strategically drawn for maximum political gain. In the second part of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia looks at how Ohio got to be this way.

Secretary of State's Office

Gov. John Kasich is backing a U.S. Supreme Court challenge to a state legislative district map from Wisconsin, saying gerrymandering creates polarization and division.Voters changed Ohio’s statehouse map-drawing process in 2015. Those who now want to change Congressional district maps are carefully watching this case – and noting Kasich’s support for it.

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