Dave Yost

Photo of Steve Dettlebach
TWITTER

The Democratic candidate for attorney general is rolling out a new slate of proposals to crack down on what he sees as corruption in state government. The plan includes an easy way for everyday Ohioans to be government watchdogs.

Former U.S. Attorney Steve Dettelbach, who’s running for attorney general, says the Ohio Statehouse is operating on a broken system where groups with strong lobbying power get special treatment.

Photo of Ohio Auditor Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A report over the weekend suggested that Ohio’s job growth for the last two years under Republican Gov. John Kasich was only slightly better than in the last two years under Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland. Now the state auditor wants to check into the state’s public private jobs creating entity.

A photo collage of Dettlebach and Yost.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Across the country, politicians and advocates have been talking about what the country should do about guns and school safety in the wake of the Florida school shooting. Those conversations are also happening in Ohio.  We take a look at what’s being said in the race for the state’s top law enforcer.

The two candidates running for Ohio Attorney General are laying out what they would do to help keep kids safe. But it's clear they have very different approaches to the issue.

Medical marijuana
BROOKINGS

Some of the companies that lost out on medical marijuana growing licenses are suing the state over the way those decisions were made and those companies are hoping courts will force the state to answer questions.  

 

Jimmy Gould of CannAscend, one of the companies bringing forward the latest lawsuit, says the state didn’t follow its own rules.

“This is the most screwed up thing I’ve ever seen.”

AUDITOR DAVID YOST
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Auditor says it’s probably too late for the state Department of Commerce to pause its medical marijuana processes to fix problems. He’s telling the department to focus now instead on defending lawsuits.

Back in December, just days after it was discovered that the state hired a man with a felony drug conviction to score medical marijuana applications, Auditor Dave Yost called for the process to stop.

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