Dave Yost

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some of the state’s top Republican officeholders who are likely to run for higher positions next year are weighing in on challenges they think Ohio faces right now.

Attorney General Mike DeWine says when people ask him about the problem facing the state that haunts him the most, he’ll say the opioid crisis. But DeWine says in reality, that’s a subset of a larger problem.

photo of Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s auditor is warning more than a dozen cities and counties that they could be on the verge of a fiscal emergency. 

The financial health indicators report breaks down Ohio’s local governments by assigning a red, green or yellow for 17 different categories. A county or city that gets too many reds or yellows is considered to be at high risk for fiscal emergency.

photo of Dave Yost
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The election for statewide office holders isn't for nearly two more years. However, that’s not stopping one candidate from announcing his candidacy now.

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost says he’s running for Attorney General in 2018.

“I’ve been preparing for this job my entire life,” he said.

Yost, a former Delaware County prosecutor, made his wishes known in a simple press release without fanfare "'cause I’m a low key kind of guy,” he said.

Photo of Ohio Auditor Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s auditor is suggesting a way for the Bureau of Workers Compensation to save money. As Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles explains, the report suggests the agency raise its rent in a key building.

The BWC headquarters is in a big building in downtown Columbus, within a 5-minute walk of the Statehouse. Some space in the building is leased to five other state agencies and commissions, at a cost of  about $4-per-square foot. That's less than the average market rate at other properties in downtown Columbus.

photo of Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s auditor is sending a message to all of Ohio’s school districts to beware of the pitfalls that can come with open enrollment, which can cost schools up to $1 million. 

When a student decides to leave one school district and enroll in another, state funding follows the student to the new district.

But state auditor Dave Yost says his office found that some districts over-extend their open enrollment by taking in too many students and, therefore, need to invest in more resources.

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