ECOT

Photo of Auditor Dave Yost
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The state auditor says the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow committed fraud by inflating student participation numbers in order to continue collecting millions in taxpayer money. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the auditor is now sending his findings to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for possible criminal investigation.

After years of speculation over how many students were actually full time at ECOT -- and if the school might have fabricated  data -- Auditor Dave Yost says he now has proof.

Photo of Bill Lager
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican candidates on this fall’s ballot are distancing themselves from the founder of what was the state’s largest online charter school. This follows a state audit that could result in criminal charges and reports of an FBI investigation for illegal campaign contributions.

Editor's note: The complete audit has been added to this story.

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost has referred findings in his long-awaited audit of what was the state’s largest charter school over to the U.S. attorney's office and Franklin County prosecutor for possible criminal charges.

David Pepper
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Numbers from the Ohio Secretary of State’s office show the so-called blue wave, nicknamed for Democratic enthusiasm that’s been evident in other states' races recently, might not be real in Ohio. 

Photo of Steve Dyer from Innovation Ohio
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Longtime critics of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, the now-closed but still controversial online charter school, say that more employees would come forward with accusations of student data manipulation had they not signed contracts with non-disclosure agreements attached.

Steve Dyer with the liberal think tank Innovation Ohio says these so-called non-disclosure agreements signed by ECOT employees cover up any possible data fraud with public money.

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