ECOT

photo of ECOT and Ohio Department of Education logos
ECOT AND OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

A Franklin County judge has dealt a serious blow to the state's largest online charter school and siding with the Ohio Department of Education.

The judge says the state can to try to recover some of the more than $100 million it paid to the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

ECOT had sued to stop the state from going forward with its attendance audit - the e-school said that using student logins for attendance violated its contract with the state.

photo of Peggy Lehner
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state’s largest online charter school is crying foul after the education department released a report showing it fell short of its estimated attendance by more than 50%. But a top education lawmaker says Ohio taxpayers deserve to know what their money is going towards.

A review of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow found that more than half of the students enrolled in the school didn’t do enough work to qualify as full time.

 The state education department says Ohio's largest online charter school severely over-reported how many students actually attended class full time. But the school says the state's report is a slap in the face to a pending court battle. 

The state says only 40% of the more than 15,000 students enrolled at the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow spent enough time learning during the day to qualify as full-time students.

photo of Rick Teeters in court
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state of Ohio and its largest e-school went head-to-head in court today over what’s required to provide education to students. 

ECOT wants a judge to halt any consequences stemming from a recent attendance audit by the Ohio Department of Education while the two sides fight over the bigger issue of what constitutes student instruction and learning opportunities.

A look at several online charter school attendance reviews reveal that more e-schools might be either unable or unwilling to meet the standards the state has set to prove students are learning. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

 

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