election 2018

photo of Mary Taylor
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor of Green says she’s still in the race for governor next year, though over the weekend she missed the largest statewide party event before the May primary.

All four Republican candidates for governor were on the program to speak at the GOP state dinner, but as Mary Taylor was to take the stage, it was announced that she couldn’t be there. Taylor says she was traveling with her son.

photo of Mike Gibbons
YOUTUBE

A Northeast Ohio businessman regarded as an underdog in the race for the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate has made a six-figure ad buy.

In his first ad, Mike Gibbons never mentions Josh Mandel’s name.

“We sent them to Washington to repeal Obamacare and cut taxes, that’s what they promised us.”

Instead the Cleveland-area business man, who’s challenging Ohio Treasurer Mandel in May’s Republican primary, takes aim at Washington insiders.

Cordray and President Obama
WHITE HOUSE ARCHIVES

The only Democrat holding statewide office in Ohio says he won’t follow through on a run for governor he was considering – because he says his favored candidate will be getting into the race.

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill said he was interested but wouldn’t make a decision on the governor’s race until January – since he’d have to leave the bench to run. But he now says he’ll be staying where he is.

Richard Cordray
WIKIMEDIA

Reporters hoping for clues on whether Richard Cordray will be running for Ohio governor next year got no satisfaction from a conference call today that included the former attorney general and current head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. But it wasn't for lack of trying.

The weekly conference call began – as it always does -- with Sen. Sherrod Brown introducing his guest and the topic – and reporters often going completely off that topic.

Mary Taylor
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Months after she made it clear she would be running for governor, Ohio’s Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor made it official. As WKSU’S M.L. Schultze reports, she did so in an increasingly rare political forum: an event where the public could – and did – ask some challenging questions.

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