energy

IBERDROLA RENEWABLES

Lawmakers are about to take a long break after spending the last five months on the $65 billion budget, and leaders are already looking at what could be the next big issue in the Ohio House and Senate.

Lawmakers took out several energy-related provisions from the budget in exchange to revisit them later this year. 

That includes loosening the zoning restrictions on where wind turbines can be placed.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof expects to address that issue along with decreasing renewable energy standards.

photo of FERC
MARK URYCKI / IDEASTREAM

The NEXUS gas pipeline is not a done deal, but a federal environmental impact statement issued on Wednesday helps clear the way for the project’s construction.

The NEXUS gas pipeline could have some negative environmental effects, but mitigation measures could reduce the impact to “less than significant levels.” That’s according to the final environmental impact statement issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 

The proposed natural gas pipeline stretches across more than 255 miles from eastern Ohio through Stark, Medina and Lorain counties and into Michigan.

Rolled steel
WKSU

  The Columbus and Cincinnati areas have already recovered the jobs lost during the recession, however Greater Cleveland still hasn’t bounced back. A recent U.S. Conference of Mayors’ report say the region’s heavier reliance on manufacturing is a big reason. But one economist says there is another factor. 

PNC Bank economist Mekael Teshome says Cleveland-area manufacturing jobs are slowly returning, but that recovery is on two tracks.

Protesters' photo
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

  State leaders started 2015 with several important issues to tackle in the energy industry. And heading into 2016, many of those questions remain unanswered. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports on what’s coming in the year ahead.

The future of green energy in Ohio dangled all year as lawmakers discussed what should happen to the state’s policies that encourage the use of renewables.

DAVIS BESSE
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Akron-based FirstEnergy's proposed rate plan is still being reviewed by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, a proposal that's drawn criticism from environmentalists and even clergy and some business groups.  WKSU's Kabir Bhatia reports.

The eight-year agreement asks that FirstEnergy’s subsidiaries buy all the power from its Sammis coal plant near Steubenville and the Davis-Besse nuclear plant, since the company says those plants cannot otherwise remain competitive and would have to be closed.