FirstEnergy

photo of utilities budget provision
OHIO SENATE

Leaders in the House and Senate are on the brink of approving a provision that would allow power companies to add another fee to your electric bill. The idea is to boost the utilities’ credit ratings.

The line item in the budget would give the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio the authority to allow price hikes in order to raise a utility’s credit rating.

photo of smoke stacks
JAMES KELLEY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Coal plants are struggling to make a profit in Ohio. And there have been proposals from regulators and lawmakers that would help prop up those plants by passing additional costs on to customers. However, legislators say their latest plan would help a struggling plant that was created under unusual circumstances that go back 60 years.

Customers could see additional fees on their electric bills to help prop up the struggling Ohio Valley Electric Corporation, a coal plant commonly known as OVEC.

Bill Seitz
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Ohio lawmakers have tabled a plan to add a fee to the electric bills of FirstEnergy customers to help pay for the utility’s unprofitable nuclear plants.

WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair reports that a key legislator is floating an alternative solution.

FirstEnergy says it needs the $300 million per year generated by a customer fee it's proposing to keep its two Ohio nuclear plants operating, Davis-Besse near Toledo and Perry east of Cleveland. 

photo of Chuck Jones
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The CEO of one of Ohio’s largest energy providers made a rare appearance before state lawmakers, pleading for nuclear plant subsidies. This push comes as the company is nearing a major decision.

FirstEnergy CEO Chuck Jones went before the Ohio Senate, saying subsidies would prop up their two struggling nuclear plants. If passed, FirstEnergy customers would see about a $5 increase to their monthly electric bills.

photo of Perry Nuclear Plant
JERRY SHARP / SHUTTERSTOCK

The proposals at the Statehouse to subsidize FirstEnergy’s two nuclear plants are getting some pushback from about 40 different entities in Ohio.

The Coalition Against Nuclear Bailouts has bipartisan support from elected officials, pastors and even organizations like AARP and the Ohio Coin Machine Association.

Pages