FirstEnergy

photo of Sammis power plant
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Utilities, energy officials and environmental advocates are all debating a landmark proposition that would set the stage for the future of energy in Ohio. And as Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, for the average consumer, this could mean paying hundreds of dollars more on electric bills.

Who should be paying to keep inefficient power plants that don’t do very well in the market afloat: The utility company or its customers?

That’s the question these proposals, known as power purchase agreements, come down to.

Protesters' photo
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

  State leaders started 2015 with several important issues to tackle in the energy industry. And heading into 2016, many of those questions remain unanswered. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports on what’s coming in the year ahead.

The future of green energy in Ohio dangled all year as lawmakers discussed what should happen to the state’s policies that encourage the use of renewables.

Kasich
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

State officials could soon decide if some electric utility customers see a hike in their bills to keep coal plants running. Now Gov. John Kasich is offering his thoughts on the issue. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio is looking over what’s known as power-purchase agreements proposed by AEP and FirstEnergy. These essentially guarantee a profit for their coal plants regardless of their value in the market.

FirstEnergy protest
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

About 20 protestors showed up at FirstEnergy headquarters in Akron today to send a holiday message to CEO Charles Jones. WKSU's Kabir Bhatia reports.

FirstEnergy is asking the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio for a new rate plan that would subsidize its Sammis coal plant near Steubenville and the Davis-Besse nuclear plant.

But the protestors gathered by the Ohio Organizing Collaborative say that’s a bad deal for consumers. They made the point by bringing FirstEnergy CEO Charles Jones a stocking filled not with coal, but with LED bulbs.

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