FirstEnergy

DAVID OHMER / FLICKR CC

One week after a surprise split with its major electricity supplier, a non-profit energy aggregator serving half-a-million Ohioans says it’s found a replacement.

The Northeast Ohio Public Energy Council or NOPEC negotiates discounted energy contracts for 200 communities across 13 Northern Ohio counties.

photo of Summit County Veterans Services logo
SUMMIT COUNTY VETERANS SERVICES

Summit County leaders are donating $20,000 to a group that supports homeless and poor veterans.

Stand Down for Veterans has been looking for donations after a warehouse fire in New Jersey destroyed most of their supplies in February.

County Executive Ilene Shapiro and FirstEnergy Foundation President Dee Lowery presented the donations today at the Summit County Veterans Service Commission.

photo of Sammis plant
FIRSTENERGY

Akron-based FirstEnergy says it plans to close 856 of its 2346 megawatts of coal power capacity in Ohio by the year 2020.  Four of the seven boilers at the Sammis power plant near Steubenville would close under the plan, while the Bay Shore plant near Toledo would close if a buyer isn't found.

The company says the facilities are no longer able to compete against gas-fired plants.

photo of FirstEnergy building
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

NOTE: This is the second of three stories examining Ohio's environmental and energy future. 

A decision to block a plan that would’ve guaranteed profits for struggling coal plants in Ohio may have created a domino effect for the future of energy in the state.

In part two of a three-part series, Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow takes a look at the history of deregulation in Ohio and the bombshell suggestion to reverse course.

photo of Cathy Cowan
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Note: This is the first of three stories examining Ohio's environmental and energy future.  

Something as simple as flipping a switch can turn the lights on and off in your home. But many major complicated decisions take place in order to keep those lights on.

As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, these decisions have reached a critical point that could change the landscape of the energy industry in Ohio.

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