Jimmy Gould

Photo of medical marijuana
BROOKINGS

Some of the companies that lost out on medical marijuana growing licenses are suing the state over the way those decisions were made and those companies are hoping courts will force the state to answer questions.  

 

Jimmy Gould of CannAscend, one of the companies bringing forward the latest lawsuit, says the state didn’t follow its own rules.

“This is the most screwed up thing I’ve ever seen.”

photo of Jimmy Gould
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Some of the people who brought a marijuana legalization plan to the ballot two years ago want to try to put a different one before voters next year.

Jimmy Gould backed the 2015 amendment which failed overwhelmingly at the ballot box, and he was recently rejected for a large cultivator’s license by the state’s medical marijuana program. But he says it’s not that rejection but rather problems with the process that are prompting him to put an all-out legalization of marijuana before voters next year.

“Let’s stop this nonsense. This is crazy.”

JIMMY GOULD
State of Ohio / OHIO PUBLIC BROADCASTING

The head of one of the companies that failed to get one of Ohio's large marijuana growing licenses says the state hired a convicted drug dealer to play a key role in the program.

Jimmy Gould is one of the backers of the failed 2015 ballot issue to legalize marijuana. Gould says Trevor C. Bozeman, owner of iCann Consulting, which the state hired to score applicants for growing licenses, has a conviction for possessing and intending to traffic drugs.

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

One of the principal backers of the failed 2015 ballot issue to legalize marijuana is threatening legal action against the state's medical pot program. 

ResponsibleOhio backer Jimmy Gould applied for at least one of the 12 large-scale cultivators' licenses for the medical marijuana program set up by lawmakers last year. He didn’t get one.

Photo of Jimmy Gould
Jo Ingles

The board that oversees Ohio’s Medical Marijuana program is making some key decisions right now. 

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy has received 370 applications from businesses that want to sell medical marijuana. Sixty spots are available and will be distributed throughout the state.

Those seeking licenses to sell include Jimmy Gould, one of those who spearheaded the failed ballot initiative to legalize marijuana back in 2015.

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