Kathleen Clyde

photo of Jon Husted
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Democrats are saying thousands of voters could be affected by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision upholding the way Ohio deletes inactive registrations. But the secretary of state, who’s also the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, says the law prevents voters from being removed before the fall election.

Photo of Kathleen Clyde
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

Democrat Kathleen Clyde was in Akron Monday to discuss her run for Ohio’s Secretary of State.

During an appearance at the Akron Press Club, Clyde said her priorities include better security for Ohio’s voting machines and automatic voter registration.

One audience member asked whether or not President Donald Trump could have an effect on midterm elections.

photo of Frank LaRose
ANDREW MEYER / WKSU

The Republican running for Ohio Secretary of State says the passion of both parties over voting issues may be doing damage to American’s confidence in their democracy. Frank Larose, the state senator who hopes to succeed Secretary of State Jon Husted, told the Akron Press Club today any move that disenfranchises any voters or allows any voter fraud is too much.

“But nobody should overstate the existence of either fraud or suppression because I think what it does is underminds the confidence that voters have.” 

A photo of : Sen. Frank LaRose (R-Hudson) gestures at a news conference with two supporters of his plan, Rep. Louis Blessing (R-Colerain) and Rep. Steve Arndt (R-Port Clinton).
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican state lawmakers say they have a plan to give Ohio’s 88 counties millions of dollars to replace thousands of voting machines that were bought more than a decade ago. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports they could be ready in time for the 2020 presidential election.

photo of Kathleen Clyde, Michelle Lapor-Hagan, Teresa Fedor and Nickie Antonio
SHANE WALKER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Four Democratic women in the Ohio Legislature are calling on the head of the Ohio House to take action against a key Republican lawmaker for derogatory comments he recently made at a going away party for a former staffer.

Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says Rep. Bill Seitz has admitted he shouldn’t have mocked some women lawmakers.

“He’s apologized for it.”

Rosenberger wants a bipartisan focus group to take on the broader subject of sexual harassment “to make sure we are listening and hearing it out.”

Pages