Kathleen Clyde

JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU / OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

The opponents of Issue 2, the Drug Price Relief Act, recently outspent backers of that proposal by a four-to-one margin. And most of the money in the opposition’s campaign war chest couldn’t be directly traced because it was in an LLC rather than a traditional political action committee.

OHIO HOUSE

A Republican candidate for Secretary of State has dropped out of the primary fight, citing party unity as her reason. 

Representative Dorothy Pelanda of Marysville was going head-to-head with Sen. Frank LaRose of Hudson in perhaps the biggest primary fight aside from the gubernatorial race. Pelanda wrote that the Ohio Republican Party is a family that must stay strong and that’s why she was ending her candidacy.

photo of Kathleen Clyde
OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A Democratic state lawmaker is taking issue with a newly introduced bill that would change the process for congressional redistricting. 

Rep. Kathleen Clyde doesn’t like the congressional redistricting bill put forward by Republican Senator Frank LaRose.

“The rules for drawing lines are not tight enough and that will not prevent the gerrymandering," Clyde says.

More candidates are coming forward to run next year, not just for governor but also other statewide offices. There’s now a race building for the state’s top elections chief in 2018.

House Majority floor leader Dorothy Pelanda of Marysville says she’ll run for Secretary of State. She’s stressing her experience as a small-business owner experience and her concerns about voter fraud, which she admits is minimal. She’s the first Republican to announce for this office.

photo of Ohio Statehouse
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Among the flood of bills that passed this week in the lame duck legislature is a controversial proposal that would require state agencies to be abolished unless lawmakers approve their continued existence.  

Republican Lou Blessing III of Cincinnati admits it’s a divisive proposal – lawmakers will review 25 state agencies every four years to make sure they’re still doing the work they were created to do.

“That is the key here – we have to actually act in order for these departments to remain in existence.”

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