Kirk Schuring

Kirk Schuring
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A controversial bill intended to shore up the fund the state uses to pay unemployment benefits might be moving forward soon. The bill’s sponsor says it’s a high wire act between labor and business groups.

The plan would require employers to pay more into the unemployment compensation fund while also requiring some buy-in from workers. This is all an attempt to bring the fund to solvency ahead of any impending recession.

Photo of House Republican leaders
Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio is trying to stabilize its unemployment benefit fund, which went deeply in debt to the feds in 2008,. And both business and labor leaders agree it needs an overhaul. But they have mixed feelings over a plan state lawmakers are considering.

Republican Rep. Kirk Schuring took the ideas he heard in a working group among labor and business leaders and put them into a bill.

He notes both sides have things they like and don’t like in it.

photo of downtown Canton, Ohio
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Visitors to Stark County will be paying more for hotel rooms starting next month after commissioners voted to double the county's hotel bed tax.

Picture of Unemployment Compensation
Andy Chow

The state seems to be one step closer to a plan that would make changes to the way the state funds the program that pays benefits to unemployed workers. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the next step is getting both labor and business to approve the idea.

 

 

 

Republican House Speaker Pro Tempore Kirk Schuring says he’s put together a plan that could save the unemployment compensation fund from taking another hit like the one in 2008 when the state had to borrow billions of dollars from the feds.

 

Republican leaders in the Legislature are still looking at the possibility of freezing Medicaid expansion, a move the governor’s office says could result in a loss of health coverage for half a million people. 

Republican lawmakers have argued that freezing enrollment for the Medicaid expansion population is one way to prepare for the possible repeal of the federal health care law. They put it in the state budget, a provision Gov. John Kasich vetoed.

Now Republican House Speaker Pro Tempore Kirk Schuring says members are once again weighing a veto override vote.

Pages