Larry Obhof

photo of Nick Celebrezze
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio House has cancelled its sessions while the Republican caucus tries to settle on who will replace Speaker Cliff Rosenberger. He resigned in April amid an FBI inquiry into his associations with lobbyists. But House Democrats and the Republican leader of the Ohio Senate say they are not going to step into the fight.

photo of Kasich, Rosenberger and Obhof
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has been urging lawmakers to pass a bill that would put a red-flag law in place to prevent people deemed dangerous by a court from buying guns. It would also ban bump stock attachments for guns and make other reforms. But despite the Republican governor's support, it appears it won’t be easy to get it passed through the GOP-dominated Legislature.

A photo of the Senate chamber on the first day of session, January 2017.
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Republican leader of Ohio’s Senate says the short-term goals of his caucus have been accomplished. But some lawmakers disagree.

Senate President Larry Obhof says senators have passed the items that are important to them and are ready to go on break for the summer.

“On the priorities that we set out, we’ve tried as much as possible that we could get those done.”

A photo of Republican Senate President Larry Obhof.
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Republican senators want to crack down on what they consider overly burdensome regulation coming from state agencies. They’re introducing a new bill after a study from George Mason University said Ohio has nearly 250,000 regulatory restrictions in its code. 

Photo of Sen. Matt Dolan, Susan Monroe, David Zak and Rep. Bill Reineke
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

County leaders are protesting the state’s strict boundary lines for wind turbines – saying the new law is forcing them to miss out on billions of dollars in economic development by thwarting any new wind farm projects. Opponents of the law still have a long journey toward changing it.

An industry-backed group called the Wind Energy Foundation reports the state is missing out on as much as $4 billion in economic development because of what it calls roadblocks to new wind projects.

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