medicaid expansion

United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, May 2:

Photo of John Kasich
JO INGLES / WKSU public radio

Gov. John Kasich has signed the new two-year $2.6 billion capital budget at the site of a planned mental and behavioral health hospital in Columbus. The hospital is one of the investments included in that spending plan. But Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, Kasich issued a warning of sorts, too.

Kasich said his decision to expand Medicaid has allowed many Ohioans to get addiction and mental health treatment. And he urged continuation of that program once he leaves office.

photo of Save Medicaid rally
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Medicaid expansion is one of Republican Gov. John Kasich’s signature accomplishments, but it’s likely to be gone if either his lieutenant governor or the attorney general is elected to replace him. And that would create a crisis for some 700,000 Ohioans in Medicaid expansion, most of whom are chronically ill or drug addicted. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler asked both Republicans about their plans.

photo of Ohio Department of Medicaid
DAN KONIK / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio's GOP Legislature passed a budget last year that requires the state to apply for permission to impose work requirements on able-bodied Medicaid recipients. That could mean thousands of Ohioans could lose their health-care coverage.

General disagreement
Generally, conservatives and liberals disagree strongly over work requirements for Medicaid recipients.  From the right is Rea Hederman with the Buckeye Institute, which calls itself a free market think tank.

photo of Ohio House Chamber
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

This year’s biggest drama at the Ohio Statehouse centered around the ongoing struggles between Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled Legislature. They culminated in a continuing battle over vetoes. 

Perhaps the most controversial item included in this year’s giant budget bill was a plan to freeze Medicaid enrollment for the expanded population.

Pages