Niraj Antani

The emergence of police body cameras has caused several communities to resolve their own questions about what is and is not public record. Lawmakers are introducing a bipartisan bill to provide a final answer.

The bill creates several exceptions to public records laws for body cameras, such as if the video shows inside a private home, private business, or shows the victim of a sex crime.

Niraj Antani
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There have only been three laws that citizens or groups have convinced Ohio voters to approve on election day – Issue 2 would have been the fourth if it had passed. Now a southwestern Ohio state representative wants to change the process to bring laws or constitutional amendments to the ballot.

photo of Bill O'Neill
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Some political analysts think one Republican lawmaker’s plan to remove the only Democratic Justice on the Ohio Supreme Court could backfire.

Niraj Antani
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As more Ohio cities purchase body cameras for their police departments, questions are being raised about whether material recorded on them should be available to the public. 

Republican State Rep. Niraj Antani says most footage recorded on police body cameras is subject to public records requests, but he thinks there should be some limitations.

“For the first time, we are going to have these videos entering private homes so I think this needs to be tackled before it gets out of control.”

Public universities in Ohio have mixed feelings about a bill that would grant voting power to their student trustees. But a lawmaker is proposing a compromise that he believes would gain their support. 

Republican Rep. Niraj Antani of the Dayton area says the new version of his bill would allow the universities to decide if student trustees should have voting power. The previous version made it mandatory.

“If universities aren’t in favor of the bill or at least neutral, some of my colleagues will not vote for it. So, this is a compromise in order to get the bill passed.”