Ohio Association of Foodbanks

photo of Monopoly house and coins
WKSU

Nearly nine years after Ohio lawmakers passed—and voters upheld— a crackdown on payday loan businesses, people are still borrowing from quick-cash lenders. And the lenders are still charging huge interest rates. Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler says another proposal to regulate the industry is back before legislators.

USDA

A new bill in the Ohio Legislature aims to crack down on food stamp fraud.

Republican Sen. Bill Coley has a message for people who shouldn’t be getting food stamps but are.

“Stop it. Stop it right now because we are going to catch you and when we catch you, you are looking at criminal prosecution.”

photo of Dave Yost
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Legislature is considering a bill to add the photos of food stamp recipients to their electronic benefit transfer or EBT cards. The idea is to stop food stamp fraud.

State Auditor Dave Yost reported on food stamp fraud last year but says he still isn’t sure how much fraud is in the system. That’s why he’s backing this bill.

“We believe this will be helpful to avoid trafficking in cards. We know that there are trafficking in food benefits that are happening around the state, and a photograph is a simple straight forward way to deter that.”

photo of Lisa Hamler-Fugitt
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Gov. John Kasich has warned state agencies and associations that this year’s budget will be tight. However, one group believes that’s exactly why Kasich needs to increase funding in one specific area.

The Ohio Association of Foodbanks is asking for a $20 million increase for hunger relief programs over the next two years.

The group’s executive director, Lisa Hamler-Fugitt, says these programs provide 30 percent of the food that’s distributed statewide to people who are underfed.

photo of Lisa Hamler-Fugitt
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio lawmakers are trying to agree on how to shore up the fund that pays jobless benefits to unemployed workers. Several advocacy groups say the lame-duck efforts still threaten people during their most vulnerable time.

A laid-off worker would be able to get unemployment checks from 26 weeks to 20 weeks based on a new bill proposed in the House and Senate. That’s up from a previous bill that would have cut the time to 12 weeks.

The bill would also require more businesses to pay more into the fund.

Pages