Ohio Congressional districts

Ohio's Congressional map based on the 2010 Census
SECRETARY OF STATE

In light of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on gerrymandering in two other states, voting-rights groups have revised their lawsuit over how Ohio draws its congressional maps. 

Photo of candidates on stage
RICK SENFTEN / WKSU public radio

A rare 16th Congressional District Republican debate last night revealed little difference on the issues between the two front runners. But attitude was a different matter. And, he third candidate on the stage stood apart on both issues and attitude.

A photo of Husted and Sykes.
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A plan to change the way the state’s map of Congressional districts will be drawn after the 2020 census will be on the May ballot as Issue 1. 

collecting signatures
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Over the past five decades, Ohio’s Congressional districts have become increasingly “safe” for incumbents. And a big reason for that is the way the districts are strategically drawn for maximum political gain. In the second part of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia looks at how Ohio got to be this way.

snapshot from The ReDistricting Game
USC Annenberg Ceenter

From Dec. 18 though the 22nd, WKSU will take a look at the laws, calculus and politics that go into drawing Ohio's congressional maps -- and what changes may be coming.

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