Ohio Congressional districts

collecting signatures
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Over the past five decades, Ohio’s Congressional districts have become increasingly “safe” for incumbents. And a big reason for that is the way the districts are strategically drawn for maximum political gain. In the second part of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines,” WKSU’s Kabir Bhatia looks at how Ohio got to be this way.

snapshot from The ReDistricting Game
USC Annenberg Ceenter

From Dec. 18 though the 22nd, WKSU will take a look at the laws, calculus and politics that go into drawing Ohio's congressional maps -- and what changes may be coming.

Mark Arehart / WKSU

Ohio’s congressional map divides Summit County into four jagged, meandering pieces – making it – along with Cuyahoga County – the most divided in the state. And unlike Cuyahoga, none of the four members of Congress who represent Summit County lives in the county.

In the first part of our series Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines, we take a look at what that means when it comes to representing the area in D.C.

Kenny Yuko
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Democrats say they’ll join a bipartisan group of state lawmakers working on a new way to draw Congressional districts. But they are concerned about the timing.

Republicans on the four-member group hope to get a Congressional redistricting plan together in a few months, so voters can decide on it in May. Senate Minority Leader Kenny Yuko of Richmond Heights says he’s wondering what’s the rush.