Ohio Department of Commerce

marijuana leaves with question mark
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

An Obama-era policy that made is possible for legalized marijuana to become a reality in some states has now been rescinded by the Trump administration. What might that mean for Ohio’s medical marijuana program, which is set to be operational in September?

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ new stance would allow federal prosecutors in states with marijuana programs to decide how aggressively to enforce federal laws. OSU Moritz College of Law Professor Doug Berman says this action will force politicians to take up the issue.

photo of liquor store
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It’s last call for some alcohol in Ohio. Some items are being discounted for sale and will not be restocked.

The Ohio Department of Commerce, the agency that oversees liquor sales in the state, says there are about 700 products that will no longer be offered in the Buckeye State. Agency spokeswoman Lindsey LeBerth says the state decides how to stock shelves in its contracted stores.

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

http://wksu.org/post/ohios-auditor-calling-investigation-states-medical-marijuana-program#stream/0  

Ohio’s political leaders continue to ask questions about the process used for awarding licenses for the state’s new medical marijuana program.

STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State Auditor Dave Yost says questions about past drug convictions of a consultant who played a key role in Ohio’s new medical marijuana program, set to begin operation in September, need to be addressed now. And he believes it’s time for an investigation.

Yost says he’s troubled by reports that the consultant who graded applications from companies seeking licenses had drug convictions in his past.

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