Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

View from the offices of Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Ohio is dramatically expanding the number of caregivers who can prescribe Suboxone and other drugs for medication-assisted treatment of addiction.  The effort is part of a broader strategy to address the opioid epidemic. Not everyone thinks it’s a good idea.

Eric Wandersleben
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Starting today, the message “Start Talking!” will be on billboards across northeast Ohio…and the state. 

The outdoor advertising blitz involves hundreds of digital-display and conventional signs and is aimed at helping stem the Opioid crisis.  

ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The state is redesigning the way mental health and addiction services are covered under health-care plans. Those services are critical in fighting the deadly opioid crisis. That means a lot of testing is needed before implementing the new system.

The Behavioral Health Redesign intends to bring these services up to national standards and expand access. But it involves compensating those services through a different coding system, which could mean delays in payment.

OLESIA BILKEI / SHUTTERSTOCK

The number of babies born with drug withdrawal is eight times the rate of 10 years ago. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, the sharp climb is a direct result of Ohio’s opioid epidemic.

Babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome, or NAS, experience symptoms ranging from low birth weight to seizures.

In 2006, 20 infants were born with NAS for every 10,000 live births. In 2015, that number skyrocketed to 155 infants per 10,000 live births.