Ohio House

photo of Chuck Jones
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The CEO of one of Ohio’s largest energy providers made a rare appearance before state lawmakers, pleading for nuclear plant subsidies. This push comes as the company is nearing a major decision.

FirstEnergy CEO Chuck Jones went before the Ohio Senate, saying subsidies would prop up their two struggling nuclear plants. If passed, FirstEnergy customers would see about a $5 increase to their monthly electric bills.

photo of Heather Bishoff
OHIO HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Another Democratic member of the Ohio House has left her seat – the second since the two-year term began in January. 

Rep. Heather Bishoff abruptly resigned her seat representing Blacklick just east of Columbus on Sunday.

She said in a statement that she wants to focus on her family and work on growing her financial planning business. She also plans to move across the country to San Diego. Bishoff was just elected to her third term last fall.

photo of Marijuana
WIKIMEDIA

Ohio senators debating a medical marijuana bill passed by the Ohio House have made some changes to the plan.

A Senate committee wants to put the state’s pharmacy board in charge of the medical marijuana plan – not the Department of Commerce as was designated in the House-passed plan. It also wants to loosen requirements on doctors who recommend marijuana and put them under the oversight of the board that already governs them – the Ohio State Medical Board.

photo of Rep. Gary Scherer
OHIO STATEHOUSE

The House has overwhelmingly passed a bill that would allow for expanded use of in-car breathalyzers for those convicted of driving while intoxicated – including first-time drunk drivers. 

The bill would expand the use of what are called ignition interlock devices even for those convicted of their first drunk-driving offense. Republican Rep. Gary Scherer of Circleville is the sponsor.

Photo of Ohio Rep. Jeff Rezabek
ANDY CHOW / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A new system that prevents absentee students from being thrown out of Ohio schools is moving forward.

The Ohio House has passed a bill requiring schools to create intervention teams that would step in when a child is consistently absent. That team will meet with students and their parents to try to fix the situation to avoid going to court.

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