Ohio House

Ohio House to Hear Medical Marijuana Proposal

May 5, 2016
Kirk Schuring announcing the task force
OHIO STATEHOUSE

An Ohio House committee has approved a medical marijuana bill. The legislation now moves to the full House.

The bill would allow medical marijuana in edibles, oils and other products, but it would not allow patients to smoke or grow marijuana plants.

Public universities in Ohio have mixed feelings about a bill that would grant voting power to their student trustees. But a lawmaker is proposing a compromise that he believes would gain their support. 

Republican Rep. Niraj Antani of the Dayton area says the new version of his bill would allow the universities to decide if student trustees should have voting power. The previous version made it mandatory.

“If universities aren’t in favor of the bill or at least neutral, some of my colleagues will not vote for it. So, this is a compromise in order to get the bill passed.”

Photo of Ohio Memory Day program
JO INGLES / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

The Alzheimer’s Association has been lobbying state lawmakers to increase awareness of the disease and lobby for more public money to fight it. 

Republican House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says 5 million Americans are suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

Photo of the Ohio House chambers
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

A bill that supporters say will allow students to express their religious beliefs in school – and that will relieve districts of fears of lawsuits – has overwhelmingly passed the Republican-dominated Ohio House

The bill requires schools to give the same access to religious groups that secular groups have and would protect students who express religious beliefs via their clothing, jewelry and schoolwork.  But it worries Democratic Rep. Stephanie Howse of Cleveland.

photo of Democratic Ohio Representatives and Senators
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

As committees lead by Republicans consider bills related to abortion and guns, Democrats are drawing attention to their bills on economic and educational issues that they say are being ignored.  Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports.

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