Ohio Senate

Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 23rd:

Ohio Sen. Cliff Hite
Ohio Senate

A high-ranking Republican senator from northwest Ohio has abruptly resigned his seat. 

Cliff Hite is a former high school history teacher and football coach from Findlay who’s been in the Statehouse for a decade.

Just last month Hite said he planned to run for re-election in 2018, and was considered an important voice on agriculture and a supporter of wind energy, often breaking with the party on that issue.  In his resignation, Hite says he will focus on his health and spending time with his family.

photo of Ohio Senate override votes
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There are new efforts to combine and even eliminate some state task forces, committees and boards. 

The Ohio Senate has approved a bill that would do away with boards and committees thought to no longer be necessary or viable.

Those include the Dangerous Wild Animal State Emergency Response Commission and the Dangerous and Restricted Animals Advisory Board. They were set up after dozens of wild animals were let loose from a home near Zanesville in 2012, causing panic and the deaths of more than 50 lions, tigers, bears, wolves and a baboon.

Picture of Josh Mandel and Sherrod Brown
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

All eyes are going to be on Ohio next year for what could be one of the biggest U.S. Senate races in the country. And it looks like it might be a rematch between incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown and Republican challenger Josh Mandel. Rematches are rare but not unheard of.

 

In the history of U.S. Senate races nationwide, there have only been 46 times when the same two candidates went head-to-head in two consecutive elections.

 

Photo of Harry Meshel
CAPITOL SQUARE FOUNDATION

Democrats around the state are mourning the loss of longtime party leader Harry Meshel, known for his deep knowledge, his political savvy and his sharp tongue.

Former Senate President Harry Meshel of Youngstown championed low-paid workers, disabled people and others he felt were treated unfairly.

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