Ohio Supreme Court

King's label was among the first to produce rock and roll
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Ohio Supreme Court today  issued a reprieve that could save the life of an historic Cincinnati building.   The two-story-red brick structure looks decrepit today but it was there that, arguably, the first rock and roll song was recorded.  Mark Urycki from member station WCPN reports…

You can quibble over what constitutes the very first rock song but a good case could be made for Wynonie Harris’s 1948 recording “Good Rocking Tonight.”

photo of death penalty gavel
DAVID CARILLET / SHUTTERSTOCK

A group that fights for an end to the death penalty in Ohio has issued a new report showing a task force’s recent recommendations are not being implemented.

Photo of the Ohio Supreme Court's main courtroom
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

  The Ohio Supreme Court has issued a proposed amendment to provide some clarification for lawyers who are trying to advise clients about the state’s new medical marijuana law. 

The court’s suggested amendment to the Rules of Professional Conduct says a lawyer can assist a client regarding conduct that it permitted under the new state law, but the lawyer has to advise the client of related federal law, which says marijuana is illegal. 

  Ohio’s Department of Natural Resources said the boundaries of privately owned on the Lake Erie Shore stopped at the water’s edge of the high-water mark of the lake.  That was regardless of where deeds showed property lines to have been before erosion or water level changes.   In 2012, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled against ODNR. But four more years have passed as another aspect of the case played out.

  The Ohio Supreme Court today heard from attorneys in two cases revolving around the question of whether police body camera footage is public record. 

The first case made nationwide headlines when a white former University of Cincinnati police officer fatally shot an unarmed black man during a minor traffic stop. In the other case, state troopers initially refused to release footage of a high-speed chase. The Cincinnati Enquirer sued.

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