opioid epidemic

Local Community Meeting Allows For Open Discussion on Opioids

Oct 30, 2017

About 50 people gathered last week in a cozy community hall in Struthers, a once thriving steel town along the Mahoning River outside of Youngstown.

A simulated fire in the electric fireplace gave off a warm glow on one of the first chilly nights of the season. Sandwiches were on a long table and soft drinks in tubs on the floor.

OXICLEAN
OXICLEAN

The newest tool in the fight against fentanyl is a household cleaner. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze reports.

Attorney General Mike DeWine says researchers have found the household cleaner OxiClean is effective in cleaning up spills of the synthetic opioid fentanyl.

Glynis Board / Ohio Valley ReSource

If you’ve ever enjoyed a Budget Saver twin popsicle on a hot summer day, you can thank the employees of the Ziegenfelder frozen treat factory in Wheeling, W.Va.

Floor operator Sonny Baxter keeps the line of popsicles going in the cherry-scented worksite.

“You have to have a comprehension of how the line works, how to make them run as smooth as possible,” he says. “You have to supervise the line workers that are bagging the popsicles. You’re a friend. You’re a leader.”

Andy Chow / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The clock is ticking for Gov. John Kasich who has until Friday night to sign the $65 billion state budget that not only fills a revenue shortfall but makes some major policy changes. And there’s at least one change that could set the stage for a veto fight. 

The budget bill headed to Kasich’s desk cuts government spending across the board, gets rid of several funds that support local governments, reduces the number of tax brackets, and invests more than $175 million in the opioid epidemic.

State lawmakers are trying to hash out a final budget deal that they can send to the governor’s desk. This includes how they’ll spend money to fight the opioid epidemic while closing a more than $1 billion budget hole. There’s a big issue that looms over the discussion.

The largest chunk of state spending is Medicaid. 

But the Congressional health care debate includes talks of dramatically cutting federal funding for Medicaid and Medicaid expansion, the latter has enrolled more than 700,000 Ohioans.

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