opioids

photo of Mary Taylor
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor - who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year - is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

DOUG OPLINGER / TWITTER

Your Voice Mahoning Valley grows from a belief that the people are not being heard and that solutions to problems they face are not receiving adequate attention. The project is part of a statewide effort begun in late 2015 as Ohio news organizations worked together, experimenting with new ways to represent the people of Ohio in the 2016 election.

Measuring the Impact of Opiate Addiction in Ohio

Oct 9, 2017
screenshot of Cincinatti overdose tracker
CITY OF CINCINATTI

A Gannett Newspapers reporter who was part of a team of journalists observing the opioid epidemic across Ohio in July  wrote this about paramedics in Newark near Columbus attempting to revive a man from an overdose:

“They’ve tried spraying naloxone into his nostrils, but it’s had no effect. He’s not breathing. They’re running out of time.

DIMITRIS KALOGEROPOYLOS / FLICKR

John Carroll University is getting a $1.3 million federal grant to train graduate students as counselors in the battle against opioids.

The grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services go to medically underserved areas where people lack access to primary care or have high instances of infant mortality, mental health issues or drug abuse. Over the next four years, John Carroll will use the grant to place 80 grad students in some of those medically underserved areas.

photo of John Kasich
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

A total of 4,050 people died of drug overdoses last year in Ohio. That's a third higher than the previous year. And while Gov. John Kasich is rolling out more ways to crack down on painkiller prescriptions, critics believe there’s an obvious resource that’s not being used to combat the opioid crisis. 

Doctors can no longer write single prescriptions for powerful painkillers for longer than seven days for adults and five days for kids.

Gov. John Kasich urges for doctors to realize the part they can play in reducing opioid addiction in Ohio.

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