power plants

photo of coal
PATTY CHAN / SHUTTERSTOCK

After years in limbo, a plan to construct a new coal plant has been scrapped. That leaves Ohio without any proposals for new coal-power generation. Environmental groups see this as a critical turning point.

Since the early 2000s, the Lima energy plant has been on again and off again. But now the company behind the project is officially bowing out.

Neil Waggoner with the Beyond Coal campaign says it’s clear coal is near its end.

photo of smokestacks
JAMES KELLY / SHUTTERSTOCK

Ohio utilities are considering their next steps after federal regulators knocked down a measure that would have allowed subsidies for struggling power plants. But, there are still options from state lawmakers.

The proposal would have allowed utilities to charge their customers an extra fee to help prop up power plants that struggle to compete in the market. But the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission denied the measure.

First Energy downtown Akron
Tim Rudell / WKSU

Akron-based First Energy lost $6-point-2-billion last year as it began taking steps to get out of the competitive energy business and back into being a regulated utility.  

Big financial hits came from the “writing-down”—recognizing on the books the lost value—of its failing power generation elements. CEO Chuck Jones told an investor conference call that the nuclear plants may even have to be scrapped. “Absent something to raise the value of these units and make them attractive to a buyer, there’s only one way for us to exit this business.”