redistricting

Jack Cera
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Ohio voters may see not one, but two, issues next year overhauling the way congressional districts are drawn. In the words of one advocate: “I care about slaying the gerrymander because I’m an American.”

Here is the fourth installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines."

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

snapshot from The ReDistricting Game
USC Annenberg Ceenter

From Dec. 18 though the 22nd, WKSU will take a look at the laws, calculus and politics that go into drawing Ohio's congressional maps -- and what changes may be coming.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The leader of the Ohio House of Representatives is optimistic a new panel looking at ways to reform congressional redistricting will be able to come up with a good solution soon. 

Republican Speaker Cliff Rosenberger says the four members of the bipartisan panel are ready to work on a new plan to draw the Congressional map.

photo of voting stickers
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Backers of a plan to allow Ohio voters to vote on congressional redistricting reform this fall have cleared one more hurdle. 

photo of John Green, Kathleen Clyde, Frank LaRose, Thomas Suddes
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

Two state lawmakers were at Case Western Reserve University Thursday, explaining their proposals to change the way Ohio’s Congressional districts are drawn.

Democratic State Rep. Kathleen Clyde and Republican State Sen. Frank LaRose were part of the panel on Congressional redistricting, and both said reform needs to happen very soon.

Clyde and LaRose have introduced proposals similar to the one voters passed for Statehouse districts last year, in which a seven-member panel will draw the maps after the 2020 Census.

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