redistricting

photo of Ohio House
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

It’s highly likely Ohio voters will get to vote on a new way to draw Ohio’s Congressional disticts map in May. The House approved a plan Tuesday that passed the Senate unanimously the night before.  The passage comes in time for lawmakers to make the February 7th deadline for putting the issue before voters this spring.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger has nothing but praise for the new plan passed by lawmakers in his chamber.

Jo INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Talks continue between majority Republican lawmakers and some of those who oppose their proposal to change how congressional districts are drawn.

Sen. Bill Coley, the leader of the committee that has been hearing the proposed Republican congressional redistricting bill, says talks continue and something could happen soon.

“We’re going to continue to work through the day on both sides of the aisle and hopefully we will get this right today and will have something that we will be able to move out of committee later on today.”

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

An Ohio Senate committee is set to consider a plan Tuesday devised by legislative leaders to change the way Ohio’s Congressional district map is drawn. Some key lawmakers have been behind closed doors trying to hammer out an agreement with minority Democrats to get enough of their buy-in to make passage viable.                        

Democrats are opposed to the plan offered by Republicans in the Senate, because they say it would still allow gerrymandering.

The front page of the redistricting plan.
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

State lawmakers and some backers of a citizen-led initiative to change the way Ohio's Congressional map is drawn continue to hammer out an agreement on a new plan behind closed doors.

Republican Senate President Larry Obhof says he believes there’s hope that a deal can be reached on a plan that would be acceptable to lawmakers and to the citizens’ groups that want to put their redistricting plan on the November ballot.

Jack Cera
KAREN KASLER / OHIO PUBLIC RADIO

Ohio voters may see not one, but two, issues next year overhauling the way congressional districts are drawn. In the words of one advocate: “I care about slaying the gerrymander because I’m an American.”

Here is the fourth installment of our series, “Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines."

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

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