Sage Lewis

Picture of Brandon Robinson, Destiny Williams and Son
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU public radio

Akron continues to struggle with what to do with a tent city for homeless people – and with what to do with its bigger homelessness problem. Here's a closer look at the legal battle and the options.

Destiny Williams and her now 3-month-old son, James, have moved on from Second Chance Village.

“He was conceived here, actually, so he’s the first Second-Chance baby.”

photo of Crowd gathered for Akron Council
TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Second Chance Village, a tent city for the homeless behind a thrift store in east Akron, is under threat of removal by the city for violating zoning laws.  But the people who live there have organized themselves and are formally applying for a conditional-use zoning permit. 

Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

The operator of a tent city for homeless people says he hopes to work with officials in Akron to address neighborhood concerns.

Second Chance Village
MARK AREHART / WKSU

The owner of a homeless encampment at odds with Akron zoning laws has scrapped plans to try to bring tiny homes to the property.

photo of Dan Horrigan
KABIR BHATIA / WKSU

This Election Day, Akron voters are being asked to consider Issue 4, a quarter-percent income tax increase. It would be the first such increase in a generation.

In February, 1981, Roy Ray was capping his first year as mayor of Akron with a narrowly approved income-tax increase. The extra money was for “essential city services:" police, fire and roads.