School report cards

photo of Peggy Lehner
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The Ohio Department of Education plans to release its state school report cards tomorrow morning. And state leaders are telling parents, students and educators to brace themselves for significantly lower than usual grades.

The state has raised the bar on what qualifies as being proficient and how many students need to reach that standard to get a good report card grade.

Schools that are used to getting A’s and B’s could see their grades drop to D’s and even F’s.

logo for Ohio School Report Cards
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

The Ohio School Report Cards come out Thursday. The 2016 reports come with a change.

The report cards will include an A through F letter grade in 6 areas. The state will score most public and charter schools on test scores, how well they’ve improved, whether elementary students are learning to read, whether high schoolers are graduating, and whether graduates are prepared to go on to work or college.

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Lawmakers are pushing for the state to take a closer look at the state report cards for school districts. But some are questioning the motive behind the review. 

The new school report cards switched to an A-F grading system a few years ago in hopes of becoming easier to understand. But students, parents, school administrators and even lawmakers are still having some trouble knowing just exactly what the report cards are saying.

Photo of a Facebook meme surrounding Ohio's new school report cards
Facebook

As people around the state continue to study the latest school report cards released by the Ohio Department of Education, there seems to be at least one area causing confusion.

A Facebook meme -- circulating among parents, teachers and others -- quotes a superintendent questioning why his district’s K-3 literacy score was so low when nearly all of his students passed the third-grade reading guarantee.

Asbury reacts to Ohio's new school report cards on Ohio Public Television
"The State of Ohio" / Ohio Public Television

Some Democrats and critics of the state's school district grade cards say they should have never been released this year since the test used to formula those grades has since been scrapped. But not everyone agrees.

The Ohio School Boards Association’s Damon Asbury doesn’t have a problem with the grade cards being released but with one caveat.

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