StateImpact Ohio

photo of Ohio Board of Education meeting
WCPN

Ohio Board of Education members will wait until the fall to consider a resolution that proposes some drastic changes to the state report cards for schools and school districts. A delay on the resolution doesn’t mean the end of discussions about potential modifications.

The resolution before board members Tuesday recommended scrapping the A to F grading scale on the current state report cards, among a number of other changes.

The board voted to delay consideration of the resolution until November.

Get 2 School logo
CMSD

Cleveland school officials say a marketing and incentive program has made a drastic difference in its attendance rates. The district has now presented the program to members of the Ohio Board of Education.

The Cleveland Metropolitan School District started its “Get 2 School, You Can Make It” campaign in 2015 with the goal of changing the city’s culture around school attendance.

School desks
STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Federal law requires students with disabilities to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms, but a study from Ohio State University has found that’s not happening in Ohio, or the rest of the country.

The 1975 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act requires students with disabilities be placed in general education classrooms with their nondisabled peers “to the maximum extent appropriate” to encourage social learning.

photo of LeBron James with Akron students
AKRON PUBLIC SCHOOLS/YOUTUBE

Philanthropic groups in Cleveland say LeBron James’ departure from the Cavs may have an impact on the success of the team, but his commitment to giving back to the community has rubbed off on his former organization. That includes support for local education initiatives.

LeBron James announced last week that he’ll take his NBA career out west, joining the L.A. Lakers in the 2018-2019 season, but in Northeast Ohio, James’ philanthropic endeavors will continue.

More than 140,000 Ohio students are preparing to enter their senior year of high school, but for thousands of them, the year won’t end with a walk across a stage in a cap and gown. That is unless lawmakers move the graduation goal post once again.

It’s a lingering question that’s creating uncertainty for rising seniors in the state’s high schools.

Ja’Mya and Kenmore-Garfield’s Class of 2019

Sixteen-year-old Ja’Mya Goley is about a month away from starting her senior year at Kenmore-Garfield High School in Akron.

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