U.S. Supreme Court

Photo of dangerous algae bloom in Lake Erie
WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Friday, July 13: 

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TIM RUDELL / WKSU

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, July 10:

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MARYLAND GOV PICS / FLICKR

Even though the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that Ohio’s disputed six-year voter roll maintenance process is constitutional, no voters will be removed from the rolls till after the November election. There’s now a plan on how to go forward with voter removal after that.

photo of Senate President Larry Obhof
KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on union laws caused a national stir and sent a shock wave to labor groups in Ohio.

Some Republican lawmakers have been trying to pass bills around unions and collective bargaining for years. According to the top Senate leader, now they no longer have to.

Several so-called “Right to Work” bills have been proposed since a collective bargaining reform law was overturned in 2011.

These are measures that would make it illegal to require an employee to pay union dues in order to work.

U.S. Supreme Court building
Wiki Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-to-4 Wednesday that state government employees who decline to join a union can no longer be made to pay a share of the union’s cost of negotiating contracts.  

The decision reverses one from 1977 --Abood v. Detroit Board of Eduction--which said, while unions can’t charge non-members dues, they can levy “agency fees” because union-negotiated contracts benefit non-union workers, too.

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