Balance of Power: The Politics, Policies and People

There are hundreds of local races in 2017 including the contest for who will be the next mayor of Cleveland.  Voters also face making a decision on a number of ballot questions.

And then, there's 2018.  Campaigns are underway for next year's statewide elections including Governor and U.S. Senator.

Stay connected with the latest on politics, policies and people making the decisions at all levels affecting your lives.

Ways to Connect

Photo of Sherrod Brown
WKSU

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown says Ohio could learn from this week’s wins for Democrats in New Jersey and Virginia.

Brown says that when voters elected Democratic governors in the two states -- and a number of other Democrats around the country -- this week, they were really sending a message about the federal government and its handling of things like health care. He says that should resonate with Ohioans next year.

KAREN KASLER / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Both Republicans and Democrats are saying Tuesday’s vote gives them reasons to be hopeful about next year’s statewide election, which includes the race for governor. 

Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper says his party had big wins in mayor’s offices in 9 out of 10 large cities as well as success in traditionally red areas like Wilmington.

Issue 2 was the most expensive ballot campaign in Ohio history, and it went down big with nearly 80% of voters against it. And while supporters will take the campaign to other states, an Ohio campaign spokesperson says this election turned a light on a flaw with the process.

Yes on Issue 2 spokesperson Dennis Willard says big drug companies were able to conceal their names and the millions of dollars each contributed to defeating the Drug Price Relief Act.

photo of Cathy Harper Lee
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Issue 1, the constitutional amendment that gives crime victims legal standing, was overwhelming approved by Ohio voters at the ballot box. It passed 83-17.

A surprising win, even for supporters
Dr. Henry Nicholas financed most of the Ohio campaign to pass Issue 1, known as Marsy’s Law. It’s named for his sister, who was killed by her boyfriend in 1983. Nicholas flew in from California to be with supporters of Marsy’s Law as the results came in on Election Night. And he seemed surprised at its overwhelming passage.

photo of Curt Steiner and Dennis Willard
ANDY CHOW / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

The debate over Issue 2 stirred a fight over the rising cost of drug prices and if the proposal would actually bring those prices down. It was a fight that ultimately became the most expensive ballot campaign in Ohio history. But voters rejected the ballot measure and as Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, with all the money and debate, nothing about the drug industry will change.

A not-so-simple sell

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