Balance of Power

There's a new administration coming to Washington DC, a new legislature in Columbus  with new faces and a stronger Republican majority ,and campaigns already getting underway for this year's mayoral race in Cleveland and next year's statewide elections including Governor. Stay connected with the latest on politics, policies and people making the decisions at all levels affecting your lives.

Ways to Connect

photo of Congresswoman Joyce Beatty at a rally in Columbus
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

Ohio’s two members of the Congressional Black Caucus – both Democrats – are split over whether they’ll attend Friday’s inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump.  

Central Ohio Congresswoman Joyce Beatty says she and Georgia Congressman John Lewis are close. So she says she’s upset about Trump’s comments on Twitter slamming the civil rights icon, Lewis, as “all talk and no action," after Lewis said he doesn’t see Trump as a legitimate president.

photo of voting stickers
WKSU

A new report shows changes made to increase early voting opportunities in Ohio have not led to an increase in voter participation.

On Election Day 2004, voters in some parts of Ohio stood in long lines. Some left without voting. Since then, Ohio has allowed early voting by mail or in person. But election statistics analyst Mike Dawson says those changes haven’t increased voter turnout. 

photo of electors signing in
JO INGLES / STATEHOUSE NEWS BUREAU

There were no surprises inside the Ohio Statehouse today as the state’s 18 electors cast their ballots for Republican President-Elect Donald Trump. But as Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles reports, it wasn’t a day without controversy.

When the state’s electors arrived for their noon gathering at the Statehouse, they were greeted by about 200 protesters chanting and carrying mostly hand-made signs. Their message was clear: vote for anyone other than President-elect Donald Trump. Ann Morris of Columbus was among the protesters.

Voters in Summit County
MARK URYCKI / WKSU

The Pew Research Center has released a report that shows a progressive decline of Democratic support in the nation’s middle class, not a sudden shift with this year’s election.

photo of Ford tower
NICK CASTELE / IDEASTREAM

The city of Bedford and village of Walton Hills are neighbors in the southeast suburbs of Cleveland. They share a school district. But in this year’s presidential election, they voted for different candidates. Donald Trump carried Walton Hills with 58 percent of the vote, and 72 percent in Bedford chose Hillary Clinton. In these two communities, Democrats and Republicans wonder just how the next president will deliver on his many promises.

 

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