Exploradio

Exploradio is a bi-weekly exploration of science and innovation in Northeast Ohio.  As a trained scientist, host Jeff St. Clair considers it a privilege to meet incredibly interesting researchers and business leaders who are at the top of their field, translating their work into meaningful stories. 

KELSEY VANCE

Over the next few months, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History is celebrating the work of women scientists.

The kick-off included an unusual examination of the role of gender.

In this week’s Exploradio, we look at the series, and profiles one of the featured female scientists.

The Celebrating Women in Science series welcomes visitors with portraits of female scientists… in disguise.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

One way the state of Ohio is trying to combat the opioid crisis is by funding new technologies to prevent addiction.

Last month the University of Akron shared in $10 million in state grants as part of that initiative.

On this Week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at how a personal experience with opioids inspired a local researcher’s quest for new methods of pain relief.

It’s been nearly a hundred years since the discovery of insulin. And scientists over the past century have been gradually refining its function to make life better for people with diabetes.

Now researchers in Cleveland have developed a new generation of insulin that expands its lifesaving potential. In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the latest milestone in the molecule’s history.

Photo of Elisabeth Sapell posing in All City Candy
LUCAS MISERA / WKSU

Women face unique challenges when starting a business, from getting a loan to getting taken seriously in the marketplace. Women start businesses half as often as men nationwide, but studies suggest female entrepreneurs are less risky for investors than men.

In the first in an ongoing examination of entrepreneurship, Exploradio looks at the role women play in the start-up economy.

WKSU’s entrepreneurship intern Lucas Misera reports.

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Chances are, if you’re feeling under the weather, you can call in sick and still get paid. But for around one-third of U.S. workers, that’s not an option.

And a growing body of evidence shows that the lack of paid sick leave has consequences for all of us.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at research on the costs of not calling in sick.  

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