Exploradio

Our lives are immersed in materials and inventions that got their start in a lab somewhere.  But there’s often a sizable gap in our grasp of science and innovation compared to its impact on our daily lives. Exploradio delves deep into groundbreaking research to share stories of science and discovery and bridge the gap between the science that surrounds us and our understanding of it.

Exploradio is a bi-weekly exploration of science and innovation in Northeast Ohio.  As a former scientist, host Jeff St. Clair considers it a privilege to meet incredibly interesting researchers and business leaders who are at the top of their field, translating their work into compelling radio that tells a meaningful story. 

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For generations, fathers have felt that part of their job is to make men out of their sons. 

But a researcher at the University of Akron has found that a father’s expectations of manliness actually cause more harm than good.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair explores how a new understanding of masculinity’s role in parenting was discovered with help from a Broadway show about drag queens.

The show is Kinky Boots.  

JEFF ST.CLAIR / WKSU

Gene therapy was once viewed as a promising new way to treat many incurable diseases -- until a tragic death occurred during a clinical trial. It’s taken nearly two decades for the industry to recover, but now several Northeast Ohio researchers are once again developing DNA as medicine.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at the science and business of gene therapy.

We’re in the auditory lab at NEOMED with researcher Hui Li. He points to a computer image of colored dots lining a small section of a mouse’s inner ear.

KATE DAVIS / RAPTORS OF THE ROCKIES

A once common falcon is getting a boost from local researchers who are hoping to rebuild its numbers.

In this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair looks at efforts to improve living conditions for the tiny, but mighty kestrel.

LANG ELLIOT / MUSIC OF NATURE

After developing underground for 17-years, a swarm of buzzing cicadas will soon emerge across eastern Ohio.

A lot has changed since they were last here in 1999, including the emergence of citizen scientists.

AVERT.ORG

It’s no longer the headline- grabbing epidemic that swept through gay communities a generation ago. But today, 1.2 million Americans are still living with AIDS.

In Cleveland, a pair of researchers launched their careers at the dawn of the AIDS era, and in this week’s Exploradio, WKSU’s Jeff St.Clair finds that 35 years later they’re still working to improve the lives of people with HIV.

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