Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines

Current map of Ohio's congressional districts.
Credit U.S. Department of the Interior

If the U.S. is supposed to be a representative democracy, when did this country go from voters picking their representatives to politicians picking their voters?  Over the course of five days, WKSU will take a look at the evolution of Ohio's congressional district, how they've gone from making geographic sense to the twisted, contorted shapes they are today.

The Balance of Power for Ohio's Congressional Districts:  An Interactive Map with the Results of the 2016 Election and an Overview of the Makeup of Each District (Click on a district to get more details about it.)

A Short History of Ohio's Congressional Districts

Ways to Connect

Mark Arehart / WKSU

Ohio’s congressional map divides Summit County into four jagged, meandering pieces – making it – along with Cuyahoga County – the most divided in the state. And unlike Cuyahoga, none of the four members of Congress who represent Summit County lives in the county.

In the first part of our series Gerrymandering: Shading the Lines, we take a look at what that means when it comes to representing the area in D.C.

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