Your Voice Ohio

Credit YOUR VOICE OHIO

Starting a dialogue on Ohio's opioid crisis
Ohio has been one of the hardest hit states in the country when it comes to opioid abuse and fatalities.  The Ohio Media Project is spearheading a new collaboration among newspapers, television stations and radio stations, including WKSU, to change the way the epidemic is reported, combining resources to better serve our audiences.  We're beginning this new effort with an area that numbers clearly show is struggling the most:  the Mahoning Valley. The goal is to not just cover the problem but present potential solutions to be considered and encourage conversation in the communities we serve.

 

Ways to Connect

Measuring the Impact of Opiate Addiction in Ohio

Oct 9, 2017
screenshot of Cincinatti overdose tracker
CITY OF CINCINATTI

A Gannett Newspapers reporter who was part of a team of journalists observing the opioid epidemic across Ohio in July  wrote this about paramedics in Newark near Columbus attempting to revive a man from an overdose:

“They’ve tried spraying naloxone into his nostrils, but it’s had no effect. He’s not breathing. They’re running out of time.

There's about 10 feet between Judge Craig Hannah's courtroom bench and the place where a defendant stands to be arraigned here in Buffalo City Court.

But for 26-year-old Caitlyn Stein, it has been a long, arduous 10 feet.

"This is your first day back! Good to see you!" Judge Hannah says as he greets her.

"Good to see you," Stein says, smiling.

"We've got to do that after picture. We did the before," Judge Hannah reminds her.

Your Voice Mahoning Valley Puts Focus on Opioid Crisis

Oct 1, 2017
Your Voice Mahoning Valley logo
YOUR VOICE OHIO

Three reporters in the Mahoning Valley, Renee Fox, Jordyn Grzelewski, and Lindsay McCoy, have worked aggressively in recent years exposing the death and destruction wrought by the heroin crisis, yet despite their dire warnings on television, on the web and in newspapers, the situation here has worsened dramatically.

Tonia Wright and Tugg Massa
Amanda Rabinowitz / WKSU

There are many stories of hope woven through the tragedies of Ohio’s opioid epidemic. In this installment of our series, Opioids: Turning the Tide in the Crisis, WKSU's Amanda Rabinowitz looks at the range of recovery methods, from addicts simply helping each other out to structured treatment programs.  

Narcan kit
Amanda Rabinowitz / WKSU

Narcan (also known as Naloxone) is a medication that can reverse an overdose caused by an opioid drug. Narcan blocks the effects of opioids on the brain and quickly restores breathing. 

Last year, Ohio Gov. John Kasich signed legislation that expands the use of Narcan, making it available to schools, homeless shelters, halfway houses and treatment centers.

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