Your Vote Ohio

Credit YOUR VOTE OHIO

Reconnecting You with the Political Process
Elections in the U.S. are supposed to be about choosing the person you feel best addresses your concerns and can do the job.  However, all too often these days, it's the candidates and their campaigns who are deciding what they believe are the driving issues, not the voters.  During the 2016 elections, the Ohio Media Project will work to shift the focus back to you.  WKSU News is collaborating with newspapers, radio and television stations across the state to give you an opportunity to reengage in the political process and help get your voice heard, because it's Your Vote Ohio.

 

Ways to Connect

Political campaigning and ads are getting more personal than ever, thanks to big data. In Ohio, the Senate campaigns of Rob Portman and Ted Strickland have volunteers whose job is to go door-to-door with iPads and collect data that will be used to create ads specifically targeting you this fall.

Ad lab at the University of Akron
M.L. SCHULTZE / WKSU

Clarification: The list of options for you to check on political ads was incomplete on the earlier version of this story. The complete list is below. Also, Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania operates flackcheck and factcheck.org  

Like the cicadas -- only a lot noisier -- political ads are about to blanket Ohio and other swing states. And what’s coming is likely to be more negative, more misleading and more targeted than ever.

PRIORITIES USA

This election cycle, WKSU is teaming with nearly a dozen newspapers, radio and TV stations across Ohio to help re-engage citizens in the political process.

The project YourVoteOhio officially launched on Sunday and included a piece from Toledo Blade political reporter Tom Troy looking at the dynamics of political advertising.

OHIO MEDIA PROJECT

Political ad spending has been growing exponentially in Ohio and nationwide -- especially among the outside groups airing more than 80 percent of the ads in the GOP primaries. WKSU’s M.L. Schultze spoke with the head of one of the groups trying to keep up with the claims made in those ads, as well as those made in speeches, debates and rallies.

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